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A-M-M-O, keeps the mission rumbling on

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Matthew Olson, 39th Maintenance Squadron stockpile management production supervisor, closes the door to a munitions storage unit Jan. 31, 2019, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Matthew Olson, 39th Maintenance Squadron stockpile management production supervisor, closes the door to a munitions storage unit Jan. 31, 2019, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. Construction crews are renovating several storage units to make sure they have the appropriate weather proofing capabilities and are in compliance with the newest standards. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kirby Turbak)

Boxes of 5.56mm ammunition rest in containers Jan. 23, 2019, at Incirlik Air Base Turkey.

Boxes of 5.56mm ammunition rest in containers Jan. 23, 2019, at Incirlik Air Base Turkey. Part of the munitions flight’s duties include inspecting and inventorying all munitions to ensure serviceability, proper handling, and safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kirby Turbak)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Winston Hendrick, 39th Maintenance Squadron munitions inspector, conducts inventory for munitions Jan. 23, 2019, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Winston Hendricks, 39th Maintenance Squadron munitions inspector, conducts inventory for munitions Jan. 23, 2019, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. Ammo not only stores munitions assigned to Incirlik, but also the munitions from aircraft that have layovers and require safe storage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kirby Turbak)

An explosives sign is displayed on a truck Jan. 23, 2019, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey.

An explosives sign is displayed on a truck Jan. 23, 2019, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. Ammo provides training equipment that improves disarming and detection of explosive material for security forces and explosive ordnance disposal members. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kirby Turbak)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Winston Hendrick, 39th Maintenance Squadron munitions inspector, gives a crew brief to security forces military working dog handlers Jan. 23, 2019, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Winston Hendricks, 39th Maintenance Squadron munitions inspector, gives a crew brief to security forces military working dog handlers Jan. 23, 2019, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. Ammo provides MWD handlers with canine explosive scent training aids to keep the dogs’ detection capabilities current. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kirby Turbak)

INCIRLIK AIR BASE, Turkey --

If it involves a “boom” it’s almost guaranteed that the 39th Maintenance Squadron Munitions Flight, also known as Ammo, was involved.

The munitions flight’s main responsibility includes handling, storing and transporting munitions; they not only stores munitions assigned to Incirlik, but also the munitions from aircraft that have layovers and require safe storage.

That doesn’t mean Ammo is a one trick pony though.

“It's a little bit of everything,” said U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Christopher Standard, 39th MXS NCO in charge of munitions support equipment maintenance. “It's not one specific job every day. We store and maintain munitions for 18 custody accounts, including security forces, explosive ordnance disposal, combat arms training and maintenance and the Air Force Office of Special Investigations.”

The material stored for security forces and EOD allows them to stay up-to-date on necessary training and ensures the material stays in proper condition and is carefully handled.

“We have a courteous storage agreement with Ammo that stores our explosive training aids,” said Staff. Sgt. Jonathan Forgham, 39th Security Force Squadron military working dog trainer. “The training aids validate and certify the MWDs.”

Without proper facilities to store this material, the dogs would not be able to train using explosive scents, losing their accuracy for detecting explosives.

Munitions not only helps ensure readiness for other units, but also for themselves by updating several of their own facilities.

“Right now we have 10 facility upgrade projects going on,” said Master Sgt. Anthony Faircloth, 39th MXS materiel and systems section chief. “Some of our upgrades are reengineering all of our igloos (munition storage units) to make sure that they have weather proofing and continue to keep up with 21st century standards.”

Ammo continues to restore readiness to ensure at a moment’s notice they can handle, store, transport and arm weapon systems.