HomeNewsArticle Display

Boxing class hits fitness center

Nate Eaddie spars with Airman 1st Class Reyes at the fitness center Aug. 20. Airman Reyes is the instructor for Incirlik’s new boxing course, which focuses on basic technique and endurance training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Benjamin Wilson)

Nate Eaddie spars with Airman 1st Class Reyes at the fitness center Aug. 20. Airman Reyes is the instructor for Incirlik’s new boxing course, which focuses on basic technique and endurance training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Benjamin Wilson)

Airman 1st Class Randy Reyes, 39th Force Support Squadron fitness specialist, teaches Nate Eaddie basic boxing skills Aug. 20. Mr. Eaddie is one of Airman Reyes’ students in the new boxing class held every Tuesday and Thursday at the fitness center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Benjamin Wilson)

Airman 1st Class Randy Reyes, 39th Force Support Squadron fitness specialist, teaches Nate Eaddie basic boxing skills Aug. 20. Mr. Eaddie is one of Airman Reyes’ students in the new boxing class held every Tuesday and Thursday at the fitness center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Benjamin Wilson)

INCIRLIK AIR BASE, Turkey -- Incirlik Airmen are finding a new way to get into shape by attending boxing classes held at the fitness center.

The classes, held every Tuesday and Thursday, are a free way to learn basic boxing techniques and conditioning, said Airman 1st Class Randy Reyes, 39th Force Support Squadron fitness specialist.

Students begin the class with 45 minutes of conditioning in a racquetball court and then move to the boxing room on the second floor of the gym to practice boxing drills for 45 minutes.

The class covers three stages.

The first stage focuses on balance and posture, said Airman Reyes. Students will learn the correct boxing stance and technique for a front-hand jab.

After four sessions in stage one of training, the apprentice will move on to stage two and learn how to throw a rear-hand cross. Once these skills are mastered, the student can move on to the final stage of training and learn advanced punches, including hooks and uppercuts.

"If your basic straight punches are crisp and tight, there is really no need for all your angle punches," said Airman Reyes.

Punches and fighting stance are not the only aspects to the training a student will receive.

Shoulder exercises, core strengthening, and exercises to discipline your calves and hands are all important parts of the exercise routine, said Airman Reyes. Students always stand on the balls of their feet and have their hands up in the guard position to increase the muscle memory when they fight.

Boxing is different from many other kinds of physical training because it does not focus on one area of the body or cardio-fitness alone, said Tech. Sgt. Ossian Satterwhite, 39th Security Forces Squadron and boxer.

"Growing up, I was always taught there were three sports that give you a full body workout," said Sergeant Satterwhite. "They are wrestling, swimming and boxing. Without a pool, swimming isn't an option and wrestling requires two individuals. For boxing, you only need a heavy bag, a speed bag, a jump rope and a shadow."

Though not much equipment is needed for boxing, there are plans in place for the fitness center to better accommodate the class.

One racquetball court will be modified into a multipurpose room for martial arts, said Airman Reyes. All the equipment currently kept in the upstairs boxing room will transition into the court, giving the boxing class a less confined space to work out in.

This new room will contain most equipment a new student would need.

The gym has all the bags needed for the training; however, once a student has moved on to the later stages, they will need to get boxing hand wraps, a fitted mouth piece and possibly their own gloves, said Airman Reyes.

For more information on class dates and times, contact the fitness center at 676-6294.