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39th Communications Squadron

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brian Greilich, 39th Communications Squadron cable and antenna systems technician, stands in front of cables at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, July 6, 2018.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brian Greilich, 39th Communications Squadron cable and antenna systems technician, stands in front of cables at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, July 6, 2018. Greilich is part of the 39th CS cable and antenna maintenance section, also known as "Cable Dawgs," who are responsible for installing critical communication systems on base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Rebeccah Woodrow)

Tech. Sgt. Webb unboxes mobile APX 6500 mobile radios

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Christian Webb, 39th Communications Squadron personal wireless communications systems manager, unboxes APX 6500 mobile radios at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, June 27, 2018. Webb overseas a new infrastructure, that will standardize features and upgrade the bases radio operating system. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Octavius Thompson)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Aryn Stark, 39th Communications Squadron cable and antenna systems technician, conducts a preventive maintenance inspection on fiber optic and copper communication cables at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, Jan. 16, 2018.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Aryn Stark, 39th Communications Squadron cable and antenna systems technician, conducts a preventive maintenance inspection on fiber optic and copper communication cables at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, Jan. 16, 2018. Cable and Antenna Systems technicians support 9,000 voice and data circuits, determine degradation and fix actions, advises on infrastructure improvements and upgrades, and maintain the copper and fiber cable plant. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Huddleston)

The 39th Communications Squadron postal clerks unload packages at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, Jan. 16, 2018.

The 39th Communications Squadron postal clerks unload packages at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, Jan. 16, 2018. The packages coming off the truck are sorted for sites D, G, K, Official and Personal mail by placing them on shelves or in a post office box. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Huddleston)

A1C Tavon Trotman

Congratulations to Airman 1st Class Tavon Trotman, 86th Communications Squadron client systems technician, for winning the Larger Than Life award. Trotman is deployed here from Ramstein Air Base, Germany, to support the 39th Communications Squadron. As a client systems tech, Trotman sustains, troubleshoots, and repairs standard voice, data, video network, and cryptographic client devices in fixed and deployed environments. “During tech school I hit a rough patch and…began to give up on myself, but my classroom instructor, Master Sgt. Linstrom, would not give up on me. He took me to the side and kept telling me not to give up or quit because it would lead to a long, disappointing career of quitting and giving up. Then, on my final chance, I passed and I couldn’t believe it. He never gave up on me because he is a great leader and that’s what great leaders do for their Airmen. As I become an NCO or Officer, I will do the same.”

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Chad Humphries, 39th Communications Squadron cyber transport technician, tests the voice and networking signals on a 66 punch down block using a tone tester set.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Chad Humphries, 39th Communications Squadron cyber transport technician, tests the voice and networking signals on a 66 punch down block using a tone tester set. The 66 block connects the end users to the telephone systems' main distribution hub on base, while the tone tester checks for connectivity or inconsistencies in the connection. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Huddleston)

The 39th CS is responsible for critical command and control systems on base. The squadron maintains air traffic control systems, weapons storage area security systems, and secure and non-secure networks for more than 3,500 users.

The unit's support includes base telephone service, computers, handheld radios, cable television and communications project management.

The squadron also ensures smooth operation of the data automation center, switchboard and flightline communications. The squadron's system control facility serves as a major defense communications system hub with approximately 150 long-haul circuits, which provide a gateway for voice, data and video services to the Global Information Grid.

The unit's infrastructure office provides system and network control of the multimillion dollar base communication infrastructure, supporting 146 buildings and more than 1,200 customers.

(Current as of March 2013)