Ask Mehmet: Celsius and Fahrenheit

To ensure the safety of Airmen working in extreme weather conditions, the 39th Medical Operations Squadron’s Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight monitors the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature by testing ambient air, humidity and radiant heat to establish the heat category. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael B. Keller/Released)

When it comes to the weather while being stationed overseas, it is helpful to understand the difference between Celsius and Fahrenheit tempatures. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael B. Keller/Released)

INCIRLIK AIR BASE, Turkey -- Editor's Note: Ask Mehmet is a forum for people to ask questions of the local area, as well as the outer confines of the region and the country as a whole. To submit a question, send an e-mail with the subject "Ask Mehmet" to 39abw.pa@us.af.mil.

Mehmet, you know we are having very hot days and it's very nice to have a clock by the gate to show the time, but more importantly the temperature as well. But again, it shows the temperature in Celsius. Can you tell us please how to convert Celsius to Fahrenheit?

The Fahrenheit system is used only in the United States while the rest of the world uses the Celsius system. In the Celsius system, water freezes at 0 degree and boils at 100 degrees. In the Fahrenheit system, water freezes at 32 degrees and boils at 212 degrees.

Converting Celsius to Fahrenheit is very easy. Multiply Celsius by 1.8 then add 32. That will give you a Fahrenheit reading. Let's say you read 30 degrees Celsius. In Fahrenheit it is: 30x1.8 = 54; 54+32= 86 degrees Fahrenheit.

Converting Fahrenheit to Celsius is the same process, but backwards. Subtract 32 from Fahrenheit reading, then divide it to 1.8. That will give you a Celsius reading. Let's say you read 86 degrees in Fahrenheit. In Celsius it is: 86 - 32 = 54; 54:1.8 = 30 degrees Celsius.

One simple two-step math problem brings two different scales of measuring temperature together. After converting a few temperatures, you're sure to have a good idea of the weather in Celsius without calculation.