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39th CES implements new energy savings plan

Rasit Dincel, 39th Civil Engineer Squadron electric engineer, installs a new Residential Energy Efficiency Program wireless energy monitoring device into a Phantom Housing unit April 13, 2015, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. Each renovated housing unit is receiving the REEP monitor by the end of May 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cory W. Bush/Released)

Rasit Dincel, 39th Civil Engineer Squadron electric engineer, installs a new Residential Energy Efficiency Program wireless energy monitoring device into a Phantom Housing unit April 13, 2015, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. Each renovated housing unit is receiving the REEP monitor by the end of May 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cory W. Bush/Released)

Tech. Sgt. Alexis Martin, 39th Logistics Readiness Squadron NCO in charge of deployments, checks the energy consumption on a new Residential Energy Efficiency Program wireless energy monitoring device April 13, 2015, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. This wireless energy monitor shows instant, history and the average of each housing unit’s energy consumption, along with cost and carbon-dioxide emissions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cory W. Bush/Released)

Tech. Sgt. Alexis Martin, 39th Logistics Readiness Squadron NCO in charge of deployments, checks the energy consumption on a new Residential Energy Efficiency Program wireless energy monitoring device April 13, 2015, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. This wireless energy monitor shows instant, history and the average of each housing unit’s energy consumption, along with cost and carbon-dioxide emissions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cory W. Bush/Released)

INCIRLIK AIR BASE, Turkey -- As part of an ever shrinking military, bases across the Department of Defense are developing and implementing innovative programs to reduce energy consumption and save money.

At Incirlik Air Base, the 39th Civil Engineer Squadron implemented the Residential Energy Efficiency Program, which requires all newly renovated housing to be equipped with a wireless energy monitoring device by the end of May 2015.

After their installation, the new monitor will instantly show the average of each housing unit's energy consumption, cost, carbon-dioxide emissions and history.

"We're asking every resident to help achieve a minimum 10 percent reduction in our annual military family housing energy consumption," said Firat Ozalper, 39th Civil Engineer Squadron construction inspector.

According to Ozalper, the goal of this program is to make Incirlik's Airmen and their families aware of their consumption and give them a tool to help reduce energy cost by keeping them informed.

Ozalper explained, "The use of this program could even break a few bad habits that most of us have. For example leaving fans, lights, televisions and other appliances we tend unintentionally leave on. With the help of this monitor, families have another reminder to turn them off."

REEP monitors are currently only being installed in the newly renovated Phantom housing units, but plans are being looked at for installation at all housing units at Incirlik.

"Before we do all of the units on Incirlik AB, we want to assess the energy consumption in the Phantom units," said Ihsan Can, 39th CES electrical engineer. "The more people who join in, the bigger potential we will have to reduce our energy consumption."

According to Ozalper, families could make energy saving a game in their household.

"Airmen and their family members could set a limit that they will try to stay under," said Ozalper. "When everything is switched on in the house, identify what you can switch off to maintain a lower rate and challenge your children to do their part daily."

In order to identify houses that are equipped with a REEP monitor, a sticker will be displayed in the housing unit's window. The stickers will be a visual representation of Incirlik's contributing to saving energy and money for the Air Force.