39th CES, Dutch forces work together to support NATO mission

Mehmet Sami Sevinc and Ugur Uyar, both Vinnell-Brown and Root fire alarm technicians assigned to the 39th Civil Engineer Squadron, reset the fire suppression system in a dorm of Patriot Village, April 4, 2013, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey.  The employees of VBR provide all maintenance and upkeep to facilities at Incirlik, including the lodging area for NATO service members temporarily stationed at Incirlik in support of the Patriot Mission to deter hostile actions near the Turkish-Syrian border. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Marissa Tucker/Released)

Mehmet Sami Sevinc and Ugur Uyar, both Vinnell-Brown and Root fire alarm technicians assigned to the 39th Civil Engineer Squadron, reset the fire suppression system in a dorm of Patriot Village, April 4, 2013, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. The employees of VBR provide all maintenance and upkeep to facilities at Incirlik, including the lodging area for NATO service members temporarily stationed at Incirlik in support of the Patriot Mission to deter hostile actions near the Turkish-Syrian border. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Marissa Tucker/Released)

Dutch army soldiers relax during their off time in their room in Patriot Village Feb. 22, 2013, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. Patriot Village is Incirlik's contingency lodging facility capable of housing more than 1,200 people. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Phelps/Released)

Dutch army soldiers relax during their off time in their room in Patriot Village Feb. 22, 2013, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. Patriot Village is Incirlik's contingency lodging facility capable of housing more than 1,200 people. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Phelps/Released)

Ugur Uyar  (left) and Mehmet Sami Sevinc, both Vinnell-Brown and Root fire alarm technicians assigned to the 39th Civil Engineer Squadron, activate a fire alarm April 4, 2013, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. The VBR contractors are crucial to the Patriot Mission, ensuring incoming NATO service members have sufficient, safe living accommodations at Incirlik’s contingency lodging area. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Marissa Tucker/Released)

Ugur Uyar (left) and Mehmet Sami Sevinc, both Vinnell-Brown and Root fire alarm technicians assigned to the 39th Civil Engineer Squadron, activate a fire alarm April 4, 2013, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. The VBR contractors are crucial to the Patriot Mission, ensuring incoming NATO service members have sufficient, safe living accommodations at Incirlik’s contingency lodging area. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Marissa Tucker/Released)

INCIRLIK AIR BASE, Turkey -- When the word dropped in December 2012 that Patriots were coming to Turkey and Incirlik would play host, the 39th Civil Engineer Squadron kicked into gear to prepare Patriot Village for the stay of the army units from three different nations, which are the Netherlands, Germany and U.S.

Patriot Village is Incirlik's contingency lodging, which is capable of holding more than 1,800 people.

"It is a pretty established site. Five of the buildings are maintained year-round, but the order called for more to be used than those," said Tech. Sgt. Adam Stadler, 39th CES structures and contracting representative.

The 39th CES, along with the 39th Force Support Squadron, worked for three weeks preparing beds, cleaning, assembling furniture and making Patriot Village ready for the 1,200-person influx.

Since then, the majority of the U.S. and German armies have moved on to their Patriot battery locations, while the Dutch remain on Incirlik to man theirs.

The 39th CES works to maintain Patriot Village for their NATO counterparts.

"Comfortable living quarters are essential," Stadler said. "If it's not kept up, it would be really rough outside of work."

"Normally we build and maintain our own living and recreation areas," said Dutch army Capt. Martijn Hoogezand, 1st Netherlands Ballistic Missile Defense Task Force head of construction. "But this time, everything was already built and set up with new things for us."

Currently the 39th CES is working on replacing 24 showers to bring the facilities up to full capacity.

"Most of our work is minor repairs on Patriot Village now," Stadler said.

"Whenever we have issues with the buildings, we contact Stadler," Hoogezand added. "I'll contact him with power requirements for the Patriot site as well."

The power sources at the Patriot site ensure they are able to communicate with their different stations for proper guidance, Hoogezand explained.

"Without the ability to communicate effectively, nothing will happen or the wrong thing will happen," Hoogezand said.

The 39th CES is also working with the Dutch on a special project for a recreation and relaxation center for them in Patriot Village.

"They've linked us up with the forms that we need to fill out and the contractors for us to have our 'Holland House,'" Hoogezand explained.

The communication between the Dutch and the 39th CES has been great, Hoogezand said. "We let them know what we need, and they take care of it."

"It is really great working together through these operations," Hoogezand added. "It makes life easier."

As NATO's Patriot mission in Turkey continues, coalition forces will continue to work together bringing everything to the table to accomplish the mission and defend the nation.